About Bloggin With Rich

I was born in London in 1955 and have lived a very topsy turvey life. I left school at 15 with no qualifications, and had I not left voluntarily, I would have been asked to leave. I always felt that I didn't fit in anywhere, and as a result, by the time I reached the age of 17 I'd had 24 jobs. I joined the army in 1976 hoping that it would give me a purpose in life but instead I became even more disillusioned and turned to alcohol. I hated the army because I found it to be such a hypocritical organisation and as soon as I was eligible to do so, I bought myself out. Whilst in the military however, I did enjoy my experiences in Germany and in 1980 went back there to work, staying for six years. My heavy drinking continued during my time in Germany and by the time I returned to the UK in 1986 I was heading down into a deep depression. I managed to haul myself out of it in the mid-to-late 1990's but my life hit an all time low in 2000. In early 2001 I found my spiritual pathway and started to turn my life around. I now live in Gloucestershire in the UK and I'm a successful medium and healer. I'm also the author of ten spiritual publications and have produced five meditation and three chanting CDs. I'm a workshop facilitator in various spiritual topics and I also give profound interpretations of dreams. There are plans in 2014 for another book, provisionally entitled "An Idiots Guide To Spiritual Law" and a series of audio books in CD form. Connect with me on facebook https://www.facebook.com/authorrichardfholmes

May Your Dreams Not Come True


A rather brash young student heard that there was a very wise Zen master in the region and went to seek him out.  He located the master in a mountain temple and turned up there one day asking for council.  The young man was shown into the garden by one of the monks, where the master sat in peaceful contemplation.  “I am very ambitious and I want you to tell me how I can fulfil my dreams of a successful life”, said the young man.  Without looking at him, the master replied, “may your dreams not come true.”  The young man became angry, “what do you mean, what kind of answer is that?  I came here asking for your guidance, and that is all you can say to me; it seems that you are just an old fool.”  Still angry, the young man turned and left.

Years passed and the brash young student became a brilliant architect; well respected in his field.  He’d never forgotten his visit to the temple and what the master had said to him; in fact, it had played on his mind all through his studies and working life.  It got to the point where he couldn’t stand it anymore and he decided to take a trip back to the region, seek out the master, and tell him exactly what he thought of him.  He made the journey to the temple and demanded to see the master, who by now was quite old.  He was shown once again into the garden where the master sat in peaceful contemplation.  The man launched into his speech, “I came to see you many years ago to ask your guidance on my future, but you said, “may your dreams not come true.”  I went away and studied and now I am a successful and well respected architect.  Had I listened to you I would have achieved nothing, what do you think of that?”

The master looked at the man, smiled and said, “yes, I remember you.  So, you are now an architect are you?  Successful and well respected you say?  It seems that the only thing you are the architect of is your own bitterness.”  In that moment, the man suddenly realised what the master had meant all those years ago, and bowing his head in gracious humility, he apologised for his rudeness and left.

This story, at first glance, doesn’t appear to make any sense; why would anyone not follow their dreams?  Did the man not become very successful in his chosen profession?  However, the beauty of such stories is that they are very profound, and the reader has to dig much deeper in order to find the truth contained within them.  When we focus on outer goals, while at the same time neglecting the inner, we are only strengthening the ego.  The man in the story illustrates this by having held on to his bitterness for so many years.  The soul, however, contains unlimited possibilities, so by focusing our attention on one worldly goal we are blocking those possibilities.

When we focus on the inner, we are allowing life to open up to us in countless ways.  Had the man in the story not been so headstrong, he could have been a successful and well respected architect whilst at the same time enjoying all the unlimited opportunities that life offered.  Instead, his success (which was only relative) came at a price; the bitterness that poisoned his soul, until the penny finally dropped and he understood the master’s teaching.

The Lantern


Photo by Terry Jung on Unsplash

In ancient Japan it was quite common for people to walk with lanterns at night.  They were made out of paper and bamboo, and held a candle.  An old blind man had been to the temple, and as he was leaving to go home, a monk offered him a lantern.  “I don’t need a lantern”, exclaimed the blind man.  “Darkness or light, it’s all the same to me.”  “But you need to carry a lantern so that others may see you”, said the monk, handing him the lantern.  The blind man seemed to have walked no distance at all before someone bumped into him.  “What are you doing”,  he said, “can’t you see the lantern?”  “My friend”, replied the stranger, “I’m very sorry for bumping into you, but your candle has gone out.”

This beautiful parable tells us that external lights are limited and temporary, and will ultimately burn out.  Our inner light, on the other hand, will always “light” the way for us. The light in question being “the light of consciousness”, which is our true nature.

There is an added teaching here that tells us that we can find ourselves in situations that would appear to be disadvantageous (like the blind man), however, it is possible that when we are in those situations, our purpose is to light the way for others.

The Man With The Stick


Many centuries ago there was a city where the inhabitants had amassed much wealth, all except for one man, who had always been deemed a bit odd by everyone else.  He was an old mystic who lived alone on the outskirts.  Early one morning there was an earthquake, and the city started to crumble.  The citizens were in a blind panic and in their desperation tried to rescue what they could from their wealth of possessions.  With their arms full of diamonds, gold, money, artefacts and treasures; all were running for their lives.  Amongst all the chaos and clouds of dust the old mystic ambled along with just his stick, seemingly oblivious to what was going on around him.

One disturbed citizen stopped and said to the old man, “what are you doing?  The city is crashing down around us and we are trying to rescue what we can of our wealth, but you are just walking with your stick, as if you are taking a morning stroll.”  The old mystic laughed and said, “the stick is my only possession.  You have all measured success by the impermanence of objects, I on the other hand have the greatest wealth of all; awareness, which I carry within me.  But you are right about the morning stroll, I always take a walk at this time of the morning.”

As the flustered man continued running the old man shouted, “you can’t have a painting without the canvas!”

Indeed, you cannot start a painting if you do not have something on which to paint.  In the same way that it is a complete and utter waste of time to base your life, values and ambitions etc. on objects; even if they are objects of wealth.  The important thing is to prime the canvas (inner world) before chasing objects in the outer world.  Without these foundations in place there is nothing to support us when our own personal world comes crashing down; which it invariably does from time to time.  The old mystic was a realised soul and remained completely unmoved by the chaos around him.

The nature of the egoic mind is such that it can never be satisfied.  So, whether you crave left-handed spanners or vast amounts of money, the ego’s thirst for these things will never be quenched.  Seek first the Secret Garden of the Soul; once you are centred within this awareness, worldly objects can then be enjoyed as they were meant to be enjoyed, without fruitless obsessions.

It’s Here!


Well people… after five proof copies, six different covers and four attempts to get it through the Amazon review process, Paradise For The Ungodly – the inner wilderness of silence is finally live.  It’s been a long old journey for such a small book, but worth it.

It will be an inspirational companion, fitting unobtrusively into a coat or jacket pocket, or a handbag, for those who choose to delve into the pages.

Watch this space for my next breathtaking adventure!

Click to buy in Amazon UK

Click to buy in Amazon US

 

Paradise For The Ungodly


I’m aware that I haven’t written what I would call a “proper” post for a few weeks now.  The lull has been because I’ve been concentrating on my latest writing project.  A surprising amount of water has flowed under the bridge since my last communication however, and I thought I would share with you what is happening.  I’ve made quite a lot of technical changes to the manuscript; plus I’ve corrected the few errors that were found.  I’ve just ordered my 5th proof copy, and since the first incarnation of my book I have changed some of the fonts, increased the font size, changed the cover half a dozen times, and… changed the title and sub-title.  Yes, I have; I can’t believe I’ve done that, but I have.

Originally, the book was to be called, “The Road To Nowhere“, with the sub-title, “paradise for the ungodly.”  Now it is called, “Paradise For The Ungodly”, with the sub-title, “the inner wilderness of silence”.  I’m expecting the proof to arrive by the end of the week, so if all goes to plan, I will still be publishing before the end of August.  The pics are of the image that I’ve decided to use for the final cover, and one of the rough covers I experimented with.  Chat soon lovely people, bye for now!

Stuff!


Hi people.  I thought it was time I communicated with an update of what “stuff” is going on.  Firstly, my latest book, The Road To Nowhere.  I had some real tech nightmares with formatting, which I thought I’d solved.  As a result I added a temporary cover, which enabled me to order a couple of proof copies for the purpose of checking the interior.  To my horror the problems had returned and I was unable to resolve them.  So, I decided that I would download a fresh template and format the file again from scratch.  I’m in the process of doing this now and I expect to be finished very soon.  So watch this space!

I’ve also been painting again, and my latest piece is shown below.  As ever, the photo doesn’t do it justice.  I really like it; it looks fantastic “in the flesh.”

 

There is also the little matter of the latest edition to my family, namely my four-string box guitar; which is based on the classic cigar-box guitar.  There’s another pic below for you to feast your eyes on.  Isn’t she a beauty?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Finally, here’s a little video for your amusement.  Ladeez an’ gennelmen, I give to you Seasick Rich…

The Other Side


My plan for my next book was to put 20 mainly Zen-based parables together as a sort of “pocket companion”.  I set about putting my document together and realised that I’d miscounted; I’d only written 19.  So, here is number 20!

A monk was taking the long journey home to visit his family and inadvertently took a wrong path.  He came to the point where he faced a wide river that was fast-flowing.  He looked up and down and could see no way across.  He puzzled over his predicament for several hours.  As he was about to give up and turn back, he saw an old mendicant passing by on the opposite bank.  He cupped his hands to his mouth and shouted across, “Sir, Sir, can you tell me how to get to the other side?”  The old man stopped and looked across.  He paused for a moment and then shouted back, “my child, you are already on the other side”.

How apt to end my project with another little reminder that we are already where we need to be.  The journey itself is the destination.  Consciousness is eternal and constantly evolving, so even when we make a plan, set a goal or take a journey, it is only one of an infinite number of experiences that we encounter in our own individual evolution.  The torrentially flowing river is the mind (ego) that puts imaginary obstacles in our way.  When the veil of delusion is removed there is the realisation that there is only the One timeless Self; there never was an ego, but the false belief that there was (“I am the body” identification) enabled us to take a journey within time and space that was ultimately the means by which we realised the truth of our being.

In the end we will all come to know that the path was actually pathless, that the road travelled was a road to nowhere, to the eternal bliss of nothingness that we all are.