Marcus Aurelius


In December 2006 I approached my friend, and wonderful psychic artist, Patrick Andrews to do a spirit guide portrait for me.  Patrick only needs a piece of handwriting, which he tunes into, in order to produce such a picture.  As we live in different towns this was very convenient for me.  I sent a piece of my handwriting through the post and waited for him to tell me it was ready for collection.
In early January 2007 I got the call from Patrick and duly arranged to go and collect it.  I had no idea who the guide was; and all Patrick could tell me was that he’d had the name “Aurelius” flash through his mind whilst drawing.  I took the portrait home, got myself a nice big frame a few days later, stuck it up on the wall and kind of forgot about it.  In the ensuing weeks I got a vague picture of Aurelius a few times during meditation, but it really was very vague, so I simply forgot about it some more.
At some stage during the summer of 2010 this character started to draw close to me during my meditations and also started to work with me very closely when I was engaged in my spiritual work, to the extent that we became very close.  I was most glad to be associated with this extremely strong presence.
In February 2011 I was reading the book “The Power of Now” by Eckhart Tolle, and in the particular chapter I was reading the author quoted the most wonderful piece of philosophy from a character by the name of Marcus Aurelius, who apparently lived about 2000 years ago.
“Accept whatever comes to you woven in the pattern of your destiny, for what could more aptly fit your needs”.
I thought this a coincidence, but in my typically apathetic way, I didn’t think too much about it.
Over the next few weeks I started to think that this was too much of a coincidence.  Then on the evening of 17 March 2011 I finally decided to Google the name “Marcus Aurelius”.  To my amazement there was a whole universe of information about this truly great being.
Marcus Aurelius (121 – 180) was a Roman emperor.  He was one of only five Roman emperors to have been considered “good”.  He was also revered as a great philosopher.  The most incredible thing was that the busts of him displayed on Wikipedia did bear a remarkable resemblance to the portrait that hangs on my wall.
I know that in truth names are meaningless and that you now enjoy life in the timeless realms of the nameless and formless, but I shall still refer to you as Marcus for the sake of human logic.  So, I am truly honoured Marcus that you have made yourself known to me and that we now enjoy a close bond of brotherhood.  God bless you brother!
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